Gov. Nixon encourages Missourians to honor those who served in nation's military this Veterans Day | Governor Jay Nixon

Gov. Nixon encourages Missourians to honor those who served in nation's military this Veterans Day

November 9, 2012
Governor highlights heroism of Air Force Staff Sgt. Travis Sanford of Jefferson City, selected as a 2012 Portraits in Courage recipient for heroism in Afghanistan
Jefferson City, MO

With Veterans Day this Sunday (Nov. 11), Gov. Jay Nixon today encouraged Missourians to give renewed honor and respect to the men and women who have served in our nation's military.

"Generations of Missourians have stepped forward to serve in our armed forces, both during times of conflict and times of peace, and their numbers include many thousands who have served in Iraq and Afghanistan," Gov. Nixon said. "Both as civilians and as active-duty, they join their fellow soldiers, sailors, airmen, Coast Guard members and Marines who have proudly worn the uniform in the decades before. On behalf of the six million citizens of Missouri, I commend and thank them for their selfless service to our country, and I encourage my fellow Missourians to particularly take time this weekend to personally thank veterans."

In marking Veterans Day, Gov. Nixon highlighted the heroism of one Missourian, Air Force Staff Sgt. Travis Sanford, of Jefferson City. Staff Sgt. Sanford was selected by the U.S. Air Force as one of 20 Airmen to be a 2012 Portraits in Courage recipient because of his actions in Afghanistan.

In a letter sent last month to Staff Sgt. Sanford, the Governor wrote: "Over the past 200 years, Missourians have readily answered the call of duty in our nation's armed forces, and many have distinguished themselves in doing so. By your actions during combat in Afghanistan, you have deservedly joined that roll of honor."

Staff Sgt. Sanford was selected by the U.S. Air Force as one of 20 Airmen to be a 2012 Portraits in Courage recipient because of his actions in Afghanistan. Photo courtesy of U.S. Air Force.

The narrative in the Portraits in Courage booklet on Staff Sgt. Sanford is below:

"Staff Sergeant Travis Sanford, a special operations weatherman, was deployed to Afghanistan in 2010 as a member of a Marine special operations team. Shortly after midnight on March 8, Sergeant Sanford and his teammates left their forward operating base in a convoy to conduct a routine reconnaissance patrol to disrupt enemy movement. Two hours into the mission, Sergeant Sanford and part of the team moved to a compound south of an Afghan village. Seeing movement and hearing voices, the team established security from positions that overlooked the village. With the aid of night vision equipment, the team was able to quickly quell a firefight just prior to sunrise. However, once the sun came up, more than two dozen insurgents emerged from fortified positions and attacked with continuous machine gun fire, rocket-propelled grenades, and small arms fire.

"Manning a M-249 light machine gun, Sergeant Sanford immediately engaged the enemy with suppressive fire. After several minutes of sustained combat as enemy rounds struck their position and whipped over their heads, the team took their first casualty. A Marine near Sergeant Sanford was struck in the head by an enemy round. Without hesitation and despite being exposed to enemy fire, Sergeant Sanford began performing life-saving procedures on the Marine, Sergeant Sanford and another teammate pulled the wounded Marine to cover where Sergeant Sanford and the team's medic continued to administer critical care.

"Once the wounded Marine was on a stretcher, Sergeant Sanford carried him 50 yards across an open field so that he could be evacuated. Sergeant Sanford continued to attend to the patient where simultaneously passing weather information to the inbound medical evacuation helicopter. After the patient was transferred to the helicopter, Sergeant Sanford ran back across the field to his team to reengage in firefight. After nearly four hours of sustained engagement, the team was able to break contact and return to base. Intelligence personnel later reported that multiple combatants were either killed or wounded and several enemy fighting positions and weapons had been destroyed.

"For his heroic actions during combat, Sergeant Sanford was awarded the Bronze Star with Valor."